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Work site information days were a positive way to build relationships with the local community. The public was invited to visit the site on a set day and meet the people working there.

Work in residential, commercial and businesses areas invariably happened "behind the fences" for safety reasons. Site visit information days were proven to be an effective way for the local community to get up close to see the work and speak to the people undertaking the repairs.

Several business systems were chosen to provide efficient and effective data collation, storage, interrogation and reporting for the SCIRT rebuild, using modern, accurate and appropriate technologies. One of those was a Geographic Information System (GIS).

The SCIRT rebuild programme required a great deal of spatial position information to be collated and disseminated to those assessing the state of assets, planning, designing and constructing repairs and rebuild.

In response to driver frustration and to encourage patience and safe driving habits during traffic detours and delays, stationary drivers were given "chocolate fish" (iconic New Zealand sweets) wrapped in a message about the project.

With much of the damaged horizontal infrastructure under the road corridor, SCIRT work often had a high impact on road users. While a lot of planning went into minimising traffic delays and detours, in some locations these were inevitable. They could last for many months and create pressure and delays along detour routes.