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Effective communication and engagement with communities post-disaster was critical. It helped SCIRT build trust and tolerance during the substantial disruption created while rebuilding the city.

Effective stakeholder communication and engagement was critical to the success of SCIRT's rebuild programme. In a post-disaster environment, the community was already under considerable stress. About 150 SCIRT construction projects at any one time within a relatively small city (population approx. 360,000) could be highly disruptive to residents, businesses and commuters.

SCIRT used many communications channels to maintain an open and honest dialogue with the community during its rebuild programme. These helped build tolerance and understanding around the disruptive nature of SCIRT's work. Regular community surveys showed SCIRT's most effective communication tool was the Work Notice.

A document providing an overview of the SCIRT Communication Team, including its purpose, objectives and decision-making processes.

A document that outlines objectives and ways of working collaboratively, which team members signed to show their commitment.

A plan which outlined the scope, approach and key deliverables for communications and stakeholder engagement for SCIRT.

An example of a tool SCIRT has used to communicate its projects to a community.

An example of a tool SCIRT has used to communicate its projects to the business community.

A suite of 31 management plans were developed under the Interim Alliance Agreement prior to the start of SCIRT, to intentionally guide the organisation. These plans were reviewed annually and updated as required.

This Stakeholder Management Plan was one of these management plans, and it outlined the scope, approach and key deliverables for communications and stakeholder engagement for SCIRT's horizontal rebuild programme.

It set out the Operational Framework that ensured aligned, coordinated and consistent levels of communications and engagement across all channels.

One of SCIRT's objectives was to "be proactive and communicate face-to-face where possible". It also aimed to be "approachable". These objectives were regularly measured in community surveys.

Door-knocking was a successful way to meet these objectives and encourage positive contact between SCIRT and the community. It was particularly important in a post-disaster environment where people were coping with many stressors and their ability to process information was impaired. It was also important in communities where written communication was less effective.